• Ultra High Net Worth Individual (UHNWI)

    • in Finance

      Ultra high net worth individuals (UHNWI) are people with investable assets of at least $30 million, excluding personal assets and property such as a primary residence, collectibles and consumer durables. UHNWIs comprise the richest people in the world and control a disproportionate amount of global wealth. Ultra-high net worth is generally quoted in terms of liquid assets over a certain figure, but the exact amount differs by financial institution and region.

    Practice & Source: (1) Finance/Impact investing: Investopedia
  • Underserved

    • in Finance

      Potential consumers, particularly within the BoP, who lack access to mainstream suppliers of goods and services.

    Practice & Source: (1) Finance/Impact investing: TriLinc Global Impact Investing Glossary
  • Unit cost

    • in Business

      Expenditure incurred in producing one unit of a good or service, computed usually as average cost.

    Practice & Source: (1) Business/CSR: BusinessDictionary.com
  • User voice

    • in Sustainable development

      Involving the people whom an organization exists to help in the planning, delivery, and assessment of its work

    Practice & Source: (1) Sustainable development: Cecilie Hestbaek, Shona Curvers, Tris Lumley and various authors, User Voice: Putting People at the Heart of Impact Practice, NPC
    COMMENTARY

    See “use” and “voice”.

  • User(s)

    • in Business

      Entity that has authority to use an application, equipment, facility, process, or system, or one who consumes or employs a good or service to obtain a benefit or to solve a problem, and who may or may not be the actual purchaser of the item.

    Practice & Source: (1) Business/CSR: BusinessDictionary.com
    COMMENTARY

    “User” is a generic term that applies for receivers of services or users of products in the for-profit, non-profit, social enterprise, and public sectors. It is often a synonym for “client”, “customer”, or “intended beneficiary”. Some in the non-profit sector prefer “user” to “beneficiary” as it avoids the implication of the indebtedness or relative weakness of the beneficiary to the benefactor.